The Changing Seasons in haiku

by Geethanjali Rajan

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Geethanjali Rajan teaches Japanese and English in Chennai, India. She discovered haiku sometime in 2003 and is drawn towards the deep and wide possibilities of the form. She writes haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka and enjoys the collaborative writing of linked verse. Her poems have appeared in online journals and many anthologies. Her haiku have received several awards and her haibun have received Honorable Mentions thrice in the Genjuan International Haibun Contest – 2014, 2016 and 2020. She conducts workshops and engages in discussions to help create interest in haiku and allied forms. Her interests include music, books and Japanese calligraphy. She currently serves as editor of haiku at cattails. Unexpected Gift- an ebook of rengay with Sonam Chhoki (Bhutan) is available on Amazon and a second rengay book with Chhoki, Fragments of Conversation, is forthcoming.

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